Tip from the Librarian

  The Ocean State Libraries Catalog can be very helpful.  When you find the book that you are looking for, scroll down to see reviews,  a summary, a bio of the author, book profile tags and reading level. The book profile tags will link you to more books like the one you have looked up.  Wow! There are even more books to read. 

  The next list is the books chosen by the same reading level, which can be very handy when search more that the reluctant reader can just slide right into!

   Using the lookup using the Lexile score can be tricky if you are not sure of the Lexile score which is not the same as the scoring system used in the BWRSD.  So here is a link to a useful chart!  

https://www.aplearning.com/images/DownloadPDFs/

Lexile-Conversion-Chart.pdf

Happy reading!

Charlotte

Staff Review

Darwin’s Origin of Species 
by Janet Browne

I was looking for  a non-fiction book that I could read quickly, get some real knowledge from and really enjoy.  And I found it!     

The Atlantic Monthly Press has published  books that are ‘biographies’ of world changing books from “The Bible” to “Das Kapital.” The biography that I chose was Janet Browne’s “Darwin’s Origin of Species.”   She writes about all the research that went into the planning and development of the book and the personality and dedication of the author. Finally, Charles Darwin’s book was published on November 24 in 1859 with the title:  “On the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life.” Darwin had been working on it for years and knew that it would be controversial. The concept that evolution, that plants and animals change slowly from generation to generation and living beings should not be regarded carefully designed divine creations was put forward for all to debate. And they certainly did! 

   Janet Browne’s short book, only 153 pages long, I loved.  It gives you the background of the book, an intellectual bio of Charles Darwin, a summary of the controversy in Britain, and a followup of the twentieth century’s take on the book.  It has footnotes, a list of sources and suggested reading and a real index! It was a fast and inspiring read! Onward to “On the Origin of Species!” Or maybe Browne’s biography of Charles Darwin.  

   Many books in the series, “Books that Changed the World,” are in Ocean State Library Catalog.  Go on the catalog, from Title scroll down to Series and put in “Books that changed the World” for a complete list. – Charlotte

Meet the Staff – Nancy

Greetings! I’m Nancy Kellner and I joined the library staff in September 2018 as the Youth Outreach Librarian. What does a Youth Outreach Librarian do, you ask? Simply stated, anything conducted outside the four walls of our lovely Rogers Free that connects the youth of Bristol to the library and its programs. Here are some examples of our outreach programs–Reading Fur Fun (therapy dogs read with students in local schools), StoryWalks® (picture books deconstructed and mounted on stakes to be read page by page on a trail or path), Popup Story Times (fair weather story times in local parks) and attending local events like the State Street Fair and Mount Hope Farm Farmers Market. 

Because I love the interaction with patrons, I also work shifts at the library. You can find me every Tuesday night (from 4-8 pm) in the Children’s Room and occasionally at Main Circulation. 

Libraries and books have always been a part of my life. My first ever job was as a page at the Abbot Public Library in Marblehead, MA (a town not unsimilar to Bristol). I have also worked or volunteered in public libraries in Evanston, IL; Norwich and Hartford, CT; Plaistow, NH; and Northborough and Shrewsbury, MA. I spent a decade as a banker (don’t ask) and a few years as a stay-at-home mom. But the majority of my working life was as an elementary school librarian where I could combine my skills as a storyteller, my love of children’s literature, my interest in digital technology and my absolute delight at working with school aged kids. 

While I haven’t always lived in Bristol (officially a carpetbagger as I moved here in 2017), I call myself a Bristolian-by-choice. Embracing the life of a retiree I found ample opportunities to read, bake, write, volunteer, hike, bike, kayak and (just recently) learning to knit. But libraries continued to beckon and I was lucky enough to be offered this part-time job at Rogers Free Library, a place that now feels like home.

No bio would be complete without mentioning the most precious part of my life, my family–two grown children (one of each variety), a daughter-in-law (and grandchild-to-be) and my college sweetheart of a husband to whom I’ve been married for 40 plus years.

Staff Review – Children of Blood and Bone

Kyera's Library

Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha, #1)Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars

Children of Blood and Bone is a fantastic debut novel by author Tomi Adeyemi. She was inspired to write this book by West African mythology as well as the black-lives matter movement. Although that sounds like an unwieldy premise, I feel that the two inspirations blend. Despite the fact that the book is fantasy and not contemporary, it makes you think although, as I was reading it I did not equate it with the movement. Perhaps other people felt that it resonated with the movement more strongly, but I felt that it was a fantasy that made you question your perception of things in general – rather than in relation to a specific topic.

I have always been a huge fan of mythology so I was immediately intrigued by the premise of this book. Despite the…

View original post 630 more words

Staff Review – The Testaments

The Testaments is the rabidly anticipated  sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale and I was eagerly counting off the days at the beginning of September until the launch date. Virtually everything about the book was shrouded in mystery. It would be set in Gilead, it would be 15 years after the close of the first book, and there would be three point of view characters. That was it. After over 30 years of wait time in between these works, some hype was felt, especially by me. I tried not to let it color my opinions, but it was extremely difficult.

One of the recurring stars of this dystopian drama is someone readers will  be familiar with if they have read the previous installment or seen the tv show: the taser-wielding Aunt Lydia,  the scourge of Gilead. Then there is Agnes. Agnes is a true child of Gilead who doesn’t remember any other way of life but she is fearful that she will be married off to the most powerful man that will have her. Last but certainly not least is Daisy. For this Canadian teenager her whole life and identity comes into question on what she believes is her 16th birthday.

While I enjoyed  this book, I don’t think that it has quite the same acidic punch that The Handmaid’s Tale possesses and I think that is mainly due to splitting up the narrative focus between three characters. The absence of June’s incredibly strong voice leaves a considerable void for the reader, but ultimately this book is  a well-written exploration of how life finds a way even under the darkest of regimes. Drawing inspiration from current politics, as always Atwood makes it very clear what her stance is and that alone makes this a delightful read. The Testaments also sprinkles in some additional details of the inner workings of Gilead and the true corruption and dysfunction that it takes  to make the sausage. It’s not just birthmobiles and punishing handmaids; the aunts are the keepers of genealogies and they ensure that there are new aunts to go on pilgrimage outside of Gilead.

I’m honestly  really hoping based upon what happened in this book, that there will be a sequel to this sequel coming down the pipeline. As Margaret Atwood herself puts it, “All good things come to she who waits.” – Katie

 

“In the Know”

Are you the kind of person who needs to know when the latest Patterson books are available for checkout? Do you enjoy reading the latest research on a certain subject? Perhaps you are in search of new artistic inspiration? If so, we suggest looking into our  preferred searches feature. If you sign up for preferred searches, you will receive an email at the beginning of each week, alerting you to what is new! Here is how you get started:

1. Visit our catalog and sign in.
2. Now type in something you frequently search for like an author or topic. (For this example we will use the subject of knitting.)
4.Once your search appears, look to the right of the page for “preferred searches.”

5.Click on the button. That’s it! All done!