Smart Ways to Use Lynda.com

One of the many wonderful resources we have to offer is Lynda Online Courses. With your library card you have access to over 14,000 courses. Imagine all the possibilities!

Here are some things you should know:

  1. In order to access Lynda courses, you need a Rogers Free Library library card.  If you don’t already have a card, be sure to sign up HERE.
  2.  You will need  your pin to access the courses. If you need to reset your pin, click HERE.
  3. Getting started is easy. Simply visit our website and look for Lynda Online Courses.

 

 

 

 


Once you are logged into Lynda, you might be a bit overwhelmed by all the awesome content. We suggest the following:

  1. Use your mouse and hover over library and a large menu will appear. It is a nice overview of the collection! The broader topics are to the left. When you hover over each one, a larger, more detailed menu will extend to the right.

2. From here, choose a topic and click on it. Many videos will appear. We suggest using the playlist feature, which is designated with a “+” sign. This feature allows you to save courses by the name you choose, say, Marketing for my Small Business or Topics I’d like to try on a rainy day.

3. Also, notice the side menu. For those who are beginners on a topic, you may want to consider filtering courses by beginner skill level and vice versa.

We hope you enjoy these free classes. Our subscription to Lynda.com is made possible by the generosity of the Friends of the Rogers Free Library.

 

 

Tip From a Librarian – How can I find just the right book to engage my child?

With all the demands and distractions in our busy lives, finding time to encourage the love of reading in our children can be a challenge. This month we introduce a short series of tips on finding the right book for your child, making time to read, and using thoughtful questions to grow a reader. Whether reading aloud to your younger child, interactively reading with an emerging reader or reading side-by-side with your older child, check out these tips for some helpful advice.


How can I find just the right book to engage my child?

  • Read the book before you see the movie!
  • When it’s gift-giving time, buy the first book of a series and then borrow the rest from the school and public library.
  • To engage your older child, read the first chapter of a book aloud and then encourage them to finish on their own.
  • Ask your child about the class author of the month and find additional books by that author
  • Nonfiction reading is not only entertaining but important in developing reading strategies. It’s okay to read yet another book about dinosaurs!
  • Reading is reading. Magazines, comics, and the increasingly popular graphic novels all build fluency and comprehension. 
  • Ask for help: Your child’s teacher, librarian, public librarian and local booksellers have a wealth of knowledge about children’s literature.
  • Investigate on your own: Reading Rockets is a great website with tips and booklists for children of all ages.
  • And speaking of all ages, picture books are ageless. As my mentor Esme Raji Codell says in her book How to Get Your Child to Love Reading, “An excellent picture book can model the highest forms of narrative and visual art and also offer multicultural perspectives.” 

Staff Review – Out Of Africa

     Out of Africa is one of those rare movies you can watch over the years and never tire of. Isak Dinesen is a superb story teller, and the cast includes Meryl Streep and Robert Redford as love interests.  It certainly deserves the Oscars it won including Best Picture.

     We love the main characters for their struggles.  All of them have their faults, but they are all people we care about.  Dennis Finchhatten, (Robert Redford), although he loves Karen (Meryl Streep), cannot help himself but disappear into the wild for days at a time.  He also makes money selling elephant ivory. But at the same time he won’t shoot a lioness threatening Karen, unless it got “a bit” closer. And he has a tribesman friend who travels with him. 

     Karen is somewhat of a feminist.  She inherits her family’s fortune only if she marries, which she does with a friend she doesn’t love.  He leaves her, and she runs a coffee plantation in Africa using black labor that she ambiguously both expects hard work from, yet respects at the same time. 

     They have come as privileged guests who were not invited into someone else’s continent and tribe, in this case. Yet, they are not disrespectful, and they do love Africa.

     In one memorable scene, Robert Redford brings a phonograph into the plains and plays Mozart.  He says, “Just think, never a human sound in their life and then Mozart.” 

     I will not give away the ending except to say it is sad and beautiful.  One sees that they loved Africa and each other and the African people, but they didn’t belong to each other or the continent. – Tom

     

Staff Review – Zen in the Art of Writing

Zen in the Art of Writing
by Ray Bradbury

Someday I will write a book. I don’t really have a solid plan, but, I figure, if I just keep writing, at some point I will have enough content to be published! A girl can dream!

I find that I get the most writing done over the Fall and Winter months. It’s also the time where I tend to gravitate towards books about writing. I started out by reading Stephen King’s On Writing, then read some works by Vonnegut and Anne Lamott. I cannot remember how I stumbled upon Zen in the Art of Writing but I am certainly glad I did!

It was a fast read. Bradbury’s collection of essays is excellent! His energy is inspirational and makes me just want to write all day and all night. He really gets the reader pumped up about writing! If you are an aspiring writer, you  need to add this book to the top of your to-read list! – Kristin

Staff Review – And I Do Not Forgive You

And I Do Not Forgive You
by Amber Sparks

This collection of short stories was interesting in the sense that presents its theme very clearly on the cover. It is a series of stories and “other revenges.” A revenge fantasy can be a delicious treat for the psyche when done right. I found that some of these stories did not deliver on the edginess that a bright purple axe on the cover would suggest. “Mildly Unhappy With Moments of Joy” is one such story that is bogged down by its passive-aggressive tone.

 

 Passive-aggressive revenge is a very modern way to deal with problems. Personally I would much rather read something with a Shakespearean flavor.  In it two best friends seemingly drift apart. The cause is unclear. Divorced friend attempts to track down married friend even after being artfully ghosted by her. (Married friend decides to skip town in order to solidify that she really doesn’t want to talk to divorced friend.) Eventually everything settles down and the equilibrium of mild unhappiness is restored.  “In Which Athena Designs a Video Game with the Express Purpose of Trolling Her Father,” is similarly passive-aggressive, but in a much more  delightful way since Athena is making a very pointed statement by making her dad the villain of the game. 

 

“A Place for Hiding Precious Things” stood out as one of the more powerful tales. It’s about a motherless princess whose father decides that he would like for her to marry. Marry him that is. The princess and her fairy godmother are having none of that and devise a plot to facilitate an escape. This story uses the fairytale rule of three wonderfully as the princess asks for the royal seamstresses to create three dresses: one the color of blood, one the color or bone, and the last the color of death. Other honorable mentions are “Is the Future a Nice Place For Girls,” which is about a medieval queen who gets the opportunity to travel through time with her infant daughter. The Dry Cleaner from Des Moines,” is a pleasant romp as the protagonist cons a fellow conman who is able to see her despite her plain appearance as she shoplifts her way through life.  

 

The best of the tales in terms of telling a gripping and revenge-soaked story is “The Eyes of Saint Lucy,” where a daughter recounts the series of events that led her martyr-obsessed mother to strike out against her philandering husband once and for all. With a chilling refrain of, “Because there is no God,” this one is the one most likely to induce shivers.  – Katie

 

Teen Book Review – The Last Magician – Lisa Maxwell

Kyera's Library

The Last Magician

The Last Magician by Lisa Maxwell

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This was a brilliantly woven time-traveling, magical heist book and I didn’t even know how much I wanted it in my life. The book is written from multiple perspectives, which took a couple of chapters to get used to (as I was listening to the audiobook and there weren’t multiple narrators) but soon I recognized each character’s unique voice and fell into the story. In general, the plot was not fast paced but Maxwell vibrantly painted the world our main character finds herself in.

Esta is an orphan and a thief who is tasked with going back in time to alter the events of a heist that occurred in 1904 New York City. New York City is a world of mages, people will unique affinities, like Esta’s ability to manipulate the fabric of time. Esta herself is a…

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Teen Grand Opening

The Rogers Free Library celebrated the opening of its new Teen Space Sunday, February 23, with a ribbon cutting and open house. Doing the honors were (from left) Aditi Mehta, Shivani Mehta, Isabella McAdam and Dylan Barone. The space – ideal for studying, gaming, crafting and socializing – was designed and furnished with input from teens. 

The $325,000 Library renovation also included an additional 24-seat conference room for community use and quiet study spaces on the Library’s third floor. The six-month building project was handled by Middletown-based JPS Construction and Design.

The space renovation came about as a response to the public’s input during the Strategic Planning process.  The  greater Bristol community requested meeting space and a more teen friendly space. A grant from the Friends of the Rogers Free Library, a 501(c)(3) foundation, funded the project. The Friends support many of the library programs, including children’s reading programs and Lynda.com, which makes more than 14,000 video courses available to Library patrons.