Staff Review – Where’d You Go, Bernadette

 

Where’d You Go Bernadette?
By Maria Semple 

Bernadette Fox is a MacArthur Grant winning architect first, a mother to a 15 year-old daughter, and a wife I guess. This was one of those books that really just hit me at exactly the right time. I picked this book up because a patron recommended it to me and I had also seen the trailer for the movie. I found myself completely engrossed in the character’s little domestic squabbles because it was so funny. It also probably helps that I too fantasize about buying a quirky old house and then disappearing  into a thicket of blackberries. 

Bernadette’s daughter Bee has earned herself the reward of her choice because she’s been pulling in top notch grades and she decides she would like for the whole family to take a trip to Antarctica and as the title suggests, Bernadette vanishes before the family finishes zipping their parkas into their luggage. This is primarily because her husband, Elgin Branch, is seeking involuntary commitment because she has just gone far too cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs for his liking. 

This novel is written in an epistolary style (mostly in the form of emails) and I think that lends itself well to the content. The characters are so self-involved and ridiculous that it is a delight to watch them muddle their lives in such style. It was a very quick read and some marvelous hijinks ensue, but what I really wanted to delve into was the way that Semple portrays the struggles that Bernadette faces as a woman in a male-dominated field. Her one and only completed project, the Twenty Mile House, was a residence that she built using recycled and locally sourced materials before eco-consciousness was even a thing. When her house is purchased by wasteful male architect that she had some battles with over discarded fixtures, she decides she would rather destroy her noteworthy creation rather than see it in the hands of a gnat. 

All creators have been known to have artistic hissy fits from time to time, but Bernadette Fox takes this to the extreme and develops agoraphobia and what many around her consider an obstinate and abrasive personality. She’s essentially a female Howard Roark, but instead of being praised for her genius she’s branded antisocial and therefore a target for everyone in her community. Truly Bernadette’s major fault is that she demands excellence from everyone around her and most people to not measure up to her standards. As Whitney Cummings put it, “For a girl to get called crazy, we just have to send you two text messages in a row.” – Katie

 

Staff Review – Vice

 

Personally, I feel I’ve gotten my fill of politics lately by just turning on the TV news.  That said, Christian Bale is superb in his characterization of Dick Cheney, and Amy Adams is remarkable portraying Lynne Cheney.

An award-winning, in-depth characterization of the Vice President and ex-CEO of Haliburton, who, behind the scenes, reveals how much power he acquired over time.

Honestly, I fell asleep during the beginning of the movie. It is quite long.

– Deb

 

FAQ – Newspapers Galore

Q: Do you have the local newspapers to read? If so, which ones?

A: Yes we have many newspapers that you may read in the library. We have the Bristol Phoenix, Warren and Barrington Times as well as Providence Business News and Barron’s. We also have the big five – New York Times, Boston Globe, USA Today, Providence and Wall Street Journals. All newspapers are located in the reading room (a.k.a the old building). You may read the newspapers anywhere in the building, but please return them to their racks. Thanks and enjoy!

Tip from the Staff!

Do you love puzzles? Did you receive some new puzzles for Christmas and already finished them? Feel free to bring your old puzzles here! Place them on our puzzle shelf on the main floor. Others will take them home to enjoy! Perhaps you will find a new puzzle to take home as well! While you are here, stop by our puzzle table and connect a few puzzle pieces and maybe make a new friend!

 

Staff Review – The Lion King

Let me tell you, as a 90s child, I have been thoroughly enjoying the Disney movie remakes! However, I was incredibly skeptical of the 2019 Lion King remake. Very rarely am I ever impressed by computer animation, and watching an entire film made up of computer generated animals sounded awful. But, the film was great. It took me a while to get used to the animals because there was something a little too real about them. But a few moments into the movie I was hooked. The new film followed the old film storyline pretty closely, which was nice. I really loved the new personalities of Timon and Pumbaa. Made for some laugh out loud moments. And, the soundtrack was great as well!

Staff Review – Full Circle

Here’s a book for my fellow 90s kids. I don’t read many celebrity biographies. I am not crazy about celebrities. I am skeptical that they’re always trying to sell their brand or product and they’ll tailor their biography around the aforementioned. I have, however, read all the books put out by the cast of the television show Full House. I just love that show! And while I enjoyed most of the biographies, Barber’s was the best. Barber is real, honest and funny. She also writes well, which helps! I plowed through the book in two sittings. It felt like talking with a close, down-to-earth friend. Kudos to her for keeping it real throughout the whole book. No subject was off limits yet, she remained respectful while sharing very personal stories about her relationships. She shares lots of inside information about her acting days on set and also her personal journey with anxiety. Kudos to her. – Kristin

 

Staff Review – My Lady’s Choosing

My Lady’s Choosing
by Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris

In honor of Valentine’s Day I thought I would mix it up by trying something completely different. By different I mean a choose-your-own-romance novel that resembles Jane Austen on steroids. Normally I am not enraptured by this sort of work, but what I found interesting was the format. Typically narratives with branching pathways are reserved for adventure tales and not deciding who the heroine rides off into the sunset with. Essentially it takes a staple of childhood and updates it for a more mature audience and it proves to be fun.

There are four main love interest options (a few more if you count some of  the side characters that are thrown in here and there.) You are the plucky but poor attendant of a noblewoman until your life takes a turn for the better and you are freed from her service. There’s the bitingly witty Sir Benedict Granville, the absurdly manly horseman Captain Angus McTaggert, the bad boy  Lord Garraway Craven, and the charming explorer Lady Evangeline. Each plot line has their own little intrigue to entice the reader. The path you choose depends largely on whether you’re into Darcy and Elizabeth style banter, teaching war orphans, being a governess to the children of a house with a dark secret, or egyptology. 

While this book is not going to win any awards based on literary merit, it’s short and sweet. Like a lot of choose-your-own books and games, the decisions that you make are often reflective of you as a person. When I  read My Lady’s Choosing, I was specifically  aiming to go to Egypt with Lady Evangeline and found myself ending up with  an outcome that was completely unexpected. –Katie