Staff Review – Little Women

Sometimes, I am so grateful for movies. I know some of us loathe the fact that books are frequently made into movies. I get it. But for me, it is incentive to pick up (or revisit) a book. And in this case, the book is Little Women.

My friend and I went to the theater to see the latest release of Little Women directed by Greta Geriwig, starring Emma Watson (of Harry Potter) and Saoirse Ronan (of Brooklyn). I was skeptical, as Little Women has been adapted several times and my loyalty remains to the 1933 version starring Katharine Hepburn. But I was pleasantly surprised by how enjoyable this latest version was, even though there was a change at the end (which was quite satisfactory).

That got me thinking about the book. I remember reading it for school and I just loathed it, probably because I had to analyze it so much in class. As is the case with most novels I read in school. But let me tell you, I have enjoyed it immensely as an adult. I forgot how absolutely charming the girls were. As an adult I recognize and understand the themes and empathize with every character. What strikes me though, is how Alcott was able to develop such strong characters at such young ages!  And all of them are likable in their own way.  I laughed, I cried and I rejoiced for all the girls throughout the book.  How perfect! Makes me wish I had a sister! Well, not when they burn my written pages. Please do borrow Little Women from us today!

-Kristin

 

Frequently Asked Questions – Paperback Section

Question: I realize the library allows a couple of renewals on books, but what if I am a slow reader? I am afraid to be late with a book. I need more time! What can I do?

Answer: Some of you may not be aware that we have a modest paperback section on the main floor. This collection is comprised of mass market books which have been donated. These items are on the honor system. They are not barcoded therefore, are not attached to your library record. We keep these so you may take your time and read at your own pace. Enjoy!

Staff Review – The Hollywood Book Club

The Hollywood Book Club: reading with the stars
By Steven Rea

Once in a while, I need a quick and easy read. This was the perfect one for me.  Hollywood Book Club is a good book for folks who still dream of old Hollywood and black & white pictures.  Every page features a photograph of a movie star with a book in their hands. The opposite page includes a brief passage about the celebrity’s filmography along with the title of the book they are reading in the photograph. It was a neat little book!

 

Staff Review – Clockwork Angel

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Kyera's Library

Clockwork Angel
Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Clockwork Angel is the first book in the Infernal Devices trilogy by Cassandra Clare. It is set in Victorian London and has an air of steampunk – although it is not explicitly that genre. There are clockwork creations and automatons, a Shadowhunter inventor that tinkers with gears and wires, but the overall setting is not one of steam powered air machines and gear-covered outfits. As a fan of the steampunk genre and aesthetic, I quite enjoyed the subtle notes of it in this series.
The clockwork automatons are intriguing, as they are made from neither Heaven nor Hell and thus the Shadowhunters have no experience dealing with them. They create a unique foe to fight against and are a greater mystery – as our heroes do not know who truly created them, or their nefarious purpose.

Each chapter is…

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Tip from the Librarian

Do you have a long commute to work? Do you hate cleaning the house knowing you could be reading? Are you just obsessed with books and want to read all day long? Then audiobooks are for YOU!

Rogers Free Library offers two types of audiobooks – books on CD and digital downloads. Listen to CDs in the car, CD player, DVD player, or gaming system. Digital downloads can be played on computers, tablets, MP3 players, and smartphones! Get lost in a world of fantasy while ironing dress shirts! What could be better? For more information visit our catalog(s): catalog.oslri.net and ezone.oslri.net

Staff Review – Where’d You Go, Bernadette

 

Where’d You Go Bernadette?
By Maria Semple 

Bernadette Fox is a MacArthur Grant winning architect first, a mother to a 15 year-old daughter, and a wife I guess. This was one of those books that really just hit me at exactly the right time. I picked this book up because a patron recommended it to me and I had also seen the trailer for the movie. I found myself completely engrossed in the character’s little domestic squabbles because it was so funny. It also probably helps that I too fantasize about buying a quirky old house and then disappearing  into a thicket of blackberries. 

Bernadette’s daughter Bee has earned herself the reward of her choice because she’s been pulling in top notch grades and she decides she would like for the whole family to take a trip to Antarctica and as the title suggests, Bernadette vanishes before the family finishes zipping their parkas into their luggage. This is primarily because her husband, Elgin Branch, is seeking involuntary commitment because she has just gone far too cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs for his liking. 

This novel is written in an epistolary style (mostly in the form of emails) and I think that lends itself well to the content. The characters are so self-involved and ridiculous that it is a delight to watch them muddle their lives in such style. It was a very quick read and some marvelous hijinks ensue, but what I really wanted to delve into was the way that Semple portrays the struggles that Bernadette faces as a woman in a male-dominated field. Her one and only completed project, the Twenty Mile House, was a residence that she built using recycled and locally sourced materials before eco-consciousness was even a thing. When her house is purchased by wasteful male architect that she had some battles with over discarded fixtures, she decides she would rather destroy her noteworthy creation rather than see it in the hands of a gnat. 

All creators have been known to have artistic hissy fits from time to time, but Bernadette Fox takes this to the extreme and develops agoraphobia and what many around her consider an obstinate and abrasive personality. She’s essentially a female Howard Roark, but instead of being praised for her genius she’s branded antisocial and therefore a target for everyone in her community. Truly Bernadette’s major fault is that she demands excellence from everyone around her and most people to not measure up to her standards. As Whitney Cummings put it, “For a girl to get called crazy, we just have to send you two text messages in a row.” – Katie

 

Staff Review – Vice

 

Personally, I feel I’ve gotten my fill of politics lately by just turning on the TV news.  That said, Christian Bale is superb in his characterization of Dick Cheney, and Amy Adams is remarkable portraying Lynne Cheney.

An award-winning, in-depth characterization of the Vice President and ex-CEO of Haliburton, who, behind the scenes, reveals how much power he acquired over time.

Honestly, I fell asleep during the beginning of the movie. It is quite long.

– Deb