Staff Book Review

We all know Bristol, Rhode Island is super special and so are all the people who live here. What better way to pay tribute to these people than to feature them in a book?! Nadalin introduces you to the many key players past and present – founders, philanthropists, entrepreneurs, and my favorite – librarians!!  If you can’t make it to the library to borrow the book, you might be pleasantly surprised to know it is available in eBook format as well! I recommend this for anyone new to Bristol! It will give you a nice introduction to our lovely little town. If you already live here, do pick it up. It is enjoyable! – Kristin

 

Staff Book Review

 

   I thought for August it might be fun to air my opinion on what is considered great literature.  George Eliot is one of the giants of Victorian Literature.  Her novels are as giant as her reputation, and in my opinion as  dull and ponderous with a few exceptions.  The novel, Romola, is a delight.  It takes place in Renaissance Florence at a time when Intellectual and artistic ability were open to many, and Social standing and Political power were fluid.  This is the world in which we are introduced to the charming character of Tito Melema.  He begins from nothing.  He marries the most perfect woman in Florence, beautiful, kind and boring.  He has political ambitions. He is always at the right plays at the right time.  He always knows the right thing to say.  He excels at oratory.  He is modest when it serves his purpose, and likewise he is kind and handsome.  One cannot read his conversations and his perspectives on the world and not be fond of him despite his flaws.  Even when you discover he has a secret peasant wife with beautiful children whom he adores, the reader still loves him.  There are a lot of characters, and a lot happens, as in any book by George Eliot.  Much of it is interesting, but for me, one of the most fascinating and appealing characters of all times in the cannon of great literature is without a doubt Tito Melema.  Because of him, you’ll wish a very long book was longer.

-Tom

Staff Book Review


Here is a great personal finance book for millenials who don’t like to read. It is a quick read with a little bit of sass. It includes lots of illustrations, glossy pages and is sprinkled with interviews, quizzes and recipes to break up some of the nitty-gritty finance advice. You might be interested to know Fagan’s book is tied into her Youtube channel by the same name. She uses the outlet to speak to Millenials very openly about her mishaps with money and also gives advice on how they can do better. 

   The book opens with simple tips on how to get good start with your finances building an emergency fund, saving for retirement etc. These things might be common sense to some, but not to others. She covers budgeting, investing, home and even keeping your finances in check while involved in new, personal relationships. I recommend it! -Kristin

 

Click HERE to see the book in our catalog and place a hold on it.

Staff Review

Here it is-the hot new thing. I am surely in the minority when I say, I didn’t like it!  The first 100 pages were too slow for my taste. As I kept reading, I realized this was going to be one of those books with a twist at the end (predictably so because this book certainly wasn’t about great writing) and that is exactly what happened. I kind of saw it coming.  However, I enjoyed the scenery because I am always intrigued by books set in the south! Check it out!

Staff Book Review


Becoming
by Michelle Obama

Michelle Obama gives us an intimate look into her life from a child growing up in the South Side of Chicago to a family who provided the roots of the person she would “become”.  At every stage/transition of her life she looked to making herself a better person and always asked, “how can I make a difference for others?”.

I enjoyed reading about how she tackled the vast array of roles she took on.  -Janet

Staff Book Review

     Red : A Crayon’s Story
by Michael Hall

      Meet Red, a blue crayon covered in a bright red wrapper labeled (as expected) Red. Everyone expects him to behave red, whether it is to draw strawberries or hang out with yellow to make a “nice orange”. He tries, he really tries, but he just can’t. Because he’s not Red, he’s Blue. Skies and oceans are his thing. With help from a new friend he is able to realize his true color and find happiness in his own wrapper.

I love this book because it can be read on so many different levels. At its most basic it is just plain funny. But it is also a story of perseverance, friendship, acceptance and being true to yourself. -Nancy

 

Book Review

Rhode Island Memories: The Early Years, A Pictorial History
by The Providence Journal

I so enjoyed this book. I saw it advertised in the Sunday Providence Journal a few times so I ordered a copy from the library. It is a little smaller than a standard coffee table book, so it is easy to hold but that doesn’t affect the quality of the photographs. I was pleased that instead of each chapter being a photographer’s portfolio, or by the town, they split it up by core items like agriculture, education, recreation and street scenes. I was delighted to see so many photos from my hometown! Well done. -Kristin